Skeptical theism and Divine Hiddenness Part 2

On a previous blog post, I talked about the relationship between skeptical theism and the problem of divine hiddenness. Particularly, I argued that skeptical theism (by itself) will not work as a response to the argument from divine hiddenness (i.e. it fails). In that post, I didn't consider every objection, but I have since thought … Continue reading Skeptical theism and Divine Hiddenness Part 2

Reply to Travis Dumsday: Does the argument from evil undermine the hiddenness argument?

Travis Dumsday has recently published a paper arguing that the argument from evil undermines the argument from divine hiddenness. Dumsday's point is that the existence of vast amounts of suffering in the world will possibly make it to where some nonbelievers can't be convinced of God's existence no matter how much evidence God presents to them. Thus, … Continue reading Reply to Travis Dumsday: Does the argument from evil undermine the hiddenness argument?

Paul Draper and the argument from divine hiddenness

Atheist Philosopher Paul Draper seems to not have bought into J.L. Schellenberg’s hiddenness argument. Schellenberg’s argument is that if God exists, then nonresistant nonbelief will not exist. Why? Because if God exists, God would always be open to a relationship with God’s creatures, and the belief that "God exists" is necessary in order to have … Continue reading Paul Draper and the argument from divine hiddenness

Applying the hiddenness argument to animals

In terms of non-human animals, nothing has been said about them with regards to the problem of divine hiddenness. At least, nobody has formed formulated the hiddenness argument in terms to include animals. Here, I want to show that the problem of divine hiddenness includes animals. Non-human animals in our actual world aren't resistant to … Continue reading Applying the hiddenness argument to animals

Evidential argument (problem) from hell

The evidential argument from hell argues that the existence of hell (if it exists) makes God's existence improbable. The argument can be construed as follows: 1. If God exists, God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent 2. (Assumption) Hell exists 3.  If God exists, there would be no hell unless hell is necessary in order to bring … Continue reading Evidential argument (problem) from hell

The larger world of philosophy of religion

If you look through the philosophy of religion literature, you will probably notice that most of the papers have to do with either classical theism or naturalism. With theism, more specifically, you'll notice that most of those papers are by Christian theists. But, I think there is a much larger world outside of theism vs. … Continue reading The larger world of philosophy of religion

A summary of the problems with the Kalam Cosmological Argument

The Kalam Cosmological Argument is as follows: 1. Whatever begins to exist has a cause 2. The universe began to exist 3. Therefore, the universe has a cause Problems with the Kalam Cosmological Argument: 1. It assumes the A-theory of time, which is not obviously true. In fact, it's very controversial. 2. It assumes that … Continue reading A summary of the problems with the Kalam Cosmological Argument

THE PROBLEM OF DIVINE HIDDENNESS AND SKEPTICAL THEISM

Abstract: In this paper, I will first be explaining, in detail, J.L. Schellenberg's argument from divine hiddenness (also known as the argument from nonresistant nonbelief). Schellenberg's argument is commonly misunderstood, as such, I want to do the best I can in understanding his argument correctly, not only for my sake but for the sake of … Continue reading THE PROBLEM OF DIVINE HIDDENNESS AND SKEPTICAL THEISM