“There are no atheists who are non-resistant unbelievers in God”

I don't understand how some Christians think that every atheist somehow really believes in God (which would seem to entail that there really aren't any atheists) and is resistant to God. How could they possibly know? This is a hyper-skepticism with implausible consequences. How are we to take somebody's word for other similar things? You … Continue reading “There are no atheists who are non-resistant unbelievers in God”

Dr. Craig’s response to Divine Hiddenness

In a recent podcast, the defenders podcast, Craig has objections to the argument from divine hiddenness. The troubling thing is that Craig seemed to be responding to more arguments from non-belief (Drange) or lack of evidence, which aren't quite the same as Schellenberg's argument from divine hiddenness. I'm not saying that Craig was intentionally attacking … Continue reading Dr. Craig’s response to Divine Hiddenness

Aquinas’ argument from degrees, its persuasiveness, and whether it is sound

Whenever I read articles or books about Aquinas' five arguments for God, I never see much elaboration on his argument from degrees. Perhaps the authors don't find the argument sound, or they don't find it to be persuasive to general audiences. It certainly seems to be an argument that is very different from the other … Continue reading Aquinas’ argument from degrees, its persuasiveness, and whether it is sound

Objections to Tooley’s inductive argument from evil

Really the only objections I've seen to Tooley's evidential argument from evil is for theists to challenge Tooley's use of inductive logic (but as a side note, Tooley points out that most Philosophers of Religion haven't done their homework when it comes to inductive logic, and this is true) Let's just assume that Tooley's inductive … Continue reading Objections to Tooley’s inductive argument from evil

The resurrection argument and the fallacy of suppressed evidence

I'm going to first give an example of the suppressed evidence fallacy. Here’s an example: 1. Most people who live in the state of Oregon like chocolate 2. Jones lives in the state of Oregon 3. Therefore (probably), Jones likes chocolate But there's a problem. Either intentionally or not, I have left out important facts. … Continue reading The resurrection argument and the fallacy of suppressed evidence

The failure of Hick’s religious pluralism model

A genuinely pluralistic model should (1) recognize the clear differences in fundamental beliefs among the religions; (2) affirm the different religions as roughly equally effective ways of responding to the one ultimate reality, so that no single tradition is privileged; and (3) provide a coherent explanation of how (1) and (2) can be simultaneously maintained. … Continue reading The failure of Hick’s religious pluralism model